Remains, wreckage found in search for crashed Osprey in Yakushima, Japan, US Air Force says

PHOTO: The members of Japanese Coast Guard carry the debris which are believed to be from the crashed U.S. military Osprey aircraft, at a port in Yakushima, Kagoshima prefecture, southern Japan, Monday, Dec. 4, 2023PlayKyodo News via AP
WATCH Deadly US Air Force special operations Osprey crash off the coast of Japan

Wreckage and remains were discovered from the CV-22 Osprey that crashed last week off the shore of Yakushima Island, Japan, the U.S. Air Force said Monday.

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The remains of five crew members were found, but have not yet been identified, in the vicinity of Yakushima, the Air Force said. U.S. and Japan are working together to recover the remains of the Nov. 29 crash.

"Currently two crew members of the five located today have been successfully recovered by the attending teams," the Air Force said Monday. "There is an ongoing combined effort to recover the remaining crew members from the wreckage."

PHOTO: The members of Japanese Coast Guard carry the debris which are believed to be from the crashed U.S. military Osprey aircraft, at a port in Yakushima, Kagoshima prefecture, southern Japan, Monday, Dec. 4, 2023 Kyodo News via AP
The members of Japanese Coast Guard carry the debris which are believed to be from the crashed U.S. military Osprey aircraft, at a port in Yakushima, Kagoshima prefecture, southern Japan, Monday, Dec. 4, 2023

The identities of those found on Monday "have yet to be determined and will be released at a later date," officials said.

Eight crew members were onboard when the aircraft crashed. The remains of U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. Jacob "Jake" M. Galliher, 24, of Pittsfield, Massachusetts, were recovered on Dec. 1.

The other seven crew members were last in DUSTWUN status, meaning "duty status-whereabouts unknown."

"The main priority is bringing the Airmen home and taking care of their family members. Support to, and the privacy of, the families and loved ones impacted by this incident remains AFSOC's top priority," Air Force officials said in a press release.

ABC News' Chad Murray and Kevin Shalvey contributed to this story.